‘Ghostwire: Tokyo’ Game Review – The Hindu

Tango Gameworks’ long-awaited game weaves a thrilling supernatural story into a spectacular world but the combat style is a bit too simple

Tango Gameworks’ long-awaited game weaves a thrilling supernatural story into a spectacular world but the combat style is a bit too simple

Tokyo has been the setting for a few popular alternate reality stories in games and TV shows over the past two decades. Sample: The world ends with you, Persona 5, and the Netflix show Alice in Borderland. In all these stories, the city that inspired cyberpunk turns into a virtual sandbox where anything goes. Joining this list is Ghostwire: Tokyo. The game is developed by Tango Gameworks, an brainchild of Shinji Mikami from the popular resident Evil series.

Ghostwire: Tokyo

Developer: tango games

Editor: Bethesda

Price: ₹3,999 on Playstation 5, Xbox; ₹2499 on PC

Tokyo, at the start of the game, is empty. It is overrun by Yokai (known as Visitors) and most of the inhabitants have disappeared. After a car accident, the protagonist, Akito, is left for dead. He is, however, saved by the spirit of a detective, named KK, who grants him supernatural powers. KK, through Akito, wants to end the darkness that has engulfed the city. Akito, meanwhile, is more keen on protecting his family — specifically, he wants to save his kidnapped sister, Mari. The conflicts between Akito and KK and the bond they share make Ghostwire: Tokyo’s more engaging plot.

The game is full of spiritual manifestations deeply rooted in Japanese culture. As you roam Tokyo in the game, you experience its duality – concrete and neon on the one hand and ancient word shrines on the other. Sometimes wandering around an empty city reminds you of confinement. You can tackle the rooftops, where some of the funniest elements of the game are. The game also takes you inside, where you can see some of the coolest effects in the form of reality transformation.

The game’s action system is a bit disappointing. The form of combat in the game is called Ethereal Weaving, where you cast spells with fancy finger movements, much like Dr Strange in the Marvel movies. This looks interesting but after a while you want more depth and dimension in the fighting style.

The game’s graphics, however, are smooth as butter. The art is fantastic too. If you’ve played a lot of Yakuza games, you’ll feel right at home. It is hoped that the developers will modify the fighting style so that the game will be closer to perfection.