Magic Nations – Strategy Card Game Review

Magical nations may sound like a card game, but it’s a mirage. There is the promise of a card game, but just as you sit down to play it, it blows away in the breeze.

What are we talking about? Good question. Let’s start with the price. This is a game that costs £ 12.49. Remember this price, because it informs everything that follows.

Now we have settled in to play Magic Nations – Strategy Card Game and immediately got a daily login bonus. A little red flag was flying in our peripheral vision but hey, sure, we’ll take some free stuff. Then we played the tutorial. We’re not sure, but this may be the least suitable tutorial we’ve come across in recent memory. It’s basically a Catchphrase game: it reveals a small part of the big picture and expects you to understand the full game. They are real shoemakers.

Still, we dove into the countryside, playing the orc faction by default. The gameplay was pretty straightforward (we’ll get to the game itself later), and we won the first game, then the second, and the third. We were starting to master the tactics, not through the tutorial, and our XP and levels were increasing.

But then the fourth mission of the campaign hit, and we got our asses done. One post proudly mocked the fact that the recommended power level for the mission was 2000 or more, and that we were way below that (it turns out power levels increase with the XP we gain) . Okay, so we took a look at the other campaigns, as there’s one for each faction – orcs, humans, dwarves, elves, amazons, and necromancers. It turns out that only Orcs and Elves are available at launch – the rest is expected “at a later date.” Okaaaay, that red flag was waving a little more visibly now, but we kept going. The Elven Campaign was 2,400 coins – a kind of soft currency in Magic Nations – and we got roughly enough to buy it with our payment of £ 12.49. So buy it, we made it.

The first elf mission destroyed us harder than the orc campaign, as we needed a power level of 3000 for this one – 1000 more than the previous one. We had just spent all of our coins on a campaign that didn’t concern us, and our safe was empty. So what was left? Replaying the missions brings us absolutely nothing. And the daily login system was just that – daily. It wouldn’t help us get better for a week or two.

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“Quick Game” was our only option, and it took us into the online multiplayer realm. The player count proudly informed us that 34 players were playing, but we never met them. Instead, Magic Nations tried to make our opponents appear like gamers, but it soon became clear that we were paired with bots (they were playing on time and fast, so they couldn’t be human). Infuriatingly, we were always paired with robots which were the five levels closest to us. Which was fine while we were on lower levels, but quickly became problematic at around level 8. We were matched to 10 levels, which had both higher power levels but also vastly higher cards. Losing gave us token XP and gold, so Houston – we had a problem.

Magic Nations requires you to have a good deck, which means gold to buy cards; and a high power level, which means playing games. So you squash losses for a thin drizzle of reward, in the hope that she will unlock a card every five or six games. We mustn’t forget that there are also six decks here, one for each faction, so you have to repeat this dance six times if you want to see all that Magic Nations has to offer.

Magic Nations would have been a tough sell, even as a free game. He pushes pieces of reward under your door and expects you to take their sustenance, and that’s nowhere near enough. It doesn’t have enough content to slowly progress you through the game, so you end up with losses (and the occasional miraculous wins) against bots, so you can complete one of the few landmark campaign missions. . And then you start again for the elves, patiently waiting for the campaigns promised in the future, but which are not yet here.

You can buy cards and boosters, but the best cards are pretty much £ 25 to buy. £ 25! Remember the asking price of £ 12.49? As reviewers, we should be focusing on the game rather than the monetary model, but – heaven for Betsy – the Magic Nations prize is a giant gold-plated statue with a “yours” sign.

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There’s a deck of cards underneath, sure, but it’s mediocre at best. You have creatures, and only creatures, and they have attack, health, and armor. Armor is just more health, really, so there are only two stats on any given card. You attack, it destroys health; a creature dies, you replace it with another creature, until one side has no more creatures. There are a few small niceties, but they don’t mean much. With no cards to play beyond creatures, this is the simplest of card game bones, and comfortably the most weighted card game we have played in recent years.

With no spells or other cards to mix things up, just monsters, that means Magic Nations’ horrid free-to-play is resurfacing. Community cards have low stats and cannot hope to compete. Rare and expensive cards have higher stats. If you want to compete you need the rarest cards, which means grinding for dozens of hours or depositing £ 25 for a card that will only work in one of the six games on offer.

Even as a free-to-play game, Magic Nations would stink. It has a Scrooge-like approach to reward you: it’s a thin trail of breadcrumbs to a few slightly larger breadcrumbs. But Magic Nations costs £ 12.49, which gives you a mediocre deck of cards tied to a microtransaction system that EA would have rejected. At least you’ll be able to play against other FIFA Ultimate Team players; in Magic Nations, your reward is heavy losses against a line of bots.

We have no qualms that you absolutely shouldn’t be tempted to invest that £ 12.49. It’s a trap.

You can buy Magic Nations on the Xbox Store for Xbox One and Xbox Series X | S

Magic Nations may sound like a card game, but it is a mirage. There is the promise of a card game, but just as you sit down to play it, it blows away in the breeze. What are we talking about? Good question. Let’s start with the price. This is a game that costs £ 12.49. Remember this price, because it informs everything that follows. Now we have settled in to play Magic Nations – Strategy Card Game and immediately got a daily login bonus. A little red flag was flying in our peripheral vision but hey, sure, we’ll take some free stuff. Then…

Magic Nations – Strategy Card Game Review

Magic Nations – Strategy Card Game Review

2021-12-15

Dave ozzy





Advantages:

  • The card game in the center works quite well
  • Different decks have different play styles

The inconvenients:

  • Predatory monetization structure
  • Nobody plays, so it’s all against the bots
  • £ 12.49 in advance is absolutely crazy
  • The card game is generic and lacks strategy

Info:

  • Thank you very much for the free copy of the game go to – Prime Bit Games
  • Formats – Xbox Series X | S, Xbox One
  • Version reviewed – Xbox One on Xbox Series X
  • Release date – November 5, 2021
  • Introductory price from – £ 12.49


TXH Score

1.5 / 5

Advantages:

  • The card game in the center works quite well
  • Different decks have different play styles

The inconvenients:

  • Predatory monetization structure
  • Nobody plays, so it’s all against the bots
  • £ 12.49 in advance is absolutely crazy
  • The card game is generic and lacks strategy

Info:

  • Thank you very much for the free copy of the game go to – Prime Bit Games
  • Formats – Xbox Series X | S, Xbox One
  • Version reviewed – Xbox One on Xbox Series X
  • Release date – November 5, 2021
  • Introductory price from – £ 12.49

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